January 24, 2017

Ontario’s Wagering Data Released

January 16, 2017 – As part of Ontario Racing’s commitment to transparency and industry information sharing, Ontario Racing (OR) has collaborated with the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) to reconcile and provide a ten-year overview of Ontario related wagering — specifically wagering by Ontario customers, and wagering on Ontario product.

A positive indicator is that wagering has continued to recover since the April 1, 2014 inception of the Horse Racing Partnership Program, in large part due to the contributions of the Standardbred Alliance and Woodbine Thoroughbred. While there are many variables, including race dates, distribution channels and foreign exchange rates, it is clear that Ontario wagering is trending in a positive direction.

OR has also tabulated the gross revenues generated from the Pari-Mutuel Tax Reduction program, which allocates funds to industry initiatives and programs based on Ontario customer wagering.

The full dataset is available here as a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.

 

 

 

 

(with files from Ontario Racing)

Looking Forward to 2017…

January 3, 2016 – Message from Chair Sue Leslie

As we welcome the New Year, we have cause to reflect on the year that has past. 2016 was marked by significant milestones for the horse racing industry in this province. We have been given good reason to be hopeful about a long term, sustainable future for horse racing in Ontario: the government has proposed an unprecedented long term investment in our business and there is growth in wagering for the Standardbred Alliance. As an industry, our efforts to right the ship are showing promise for success into the future.

Ontario Racing conducted consultations across the province about what that future could look like, and on behalf of our directors and staff, I would like to thank everyone who took the time to participate. While challenging at times, the passion of our industry participants was reflected as a shared commitment to finding the right path forward.

As an organization, Ontario Racing is committed to working with government and the OLG to represent the needs of our industry with vigor in 2017.  As we continue to advance our governance structure, Ontario Racing emphasizes the importance of unity and support from the industry as we negotiate and secure a new long term funding framework.

There are challenges but also great opportunities facing us in 2017. I encourage everyone to be positive, stay invested in our industry and do your part to move forward collectively on the issues that will surely shape our industry’s future. Together we will continue to rebuild and grow.

 

Warmest wishes a prosperous new year,
Sue Leslie
Chair – Ontario Racing

Big Task Ahead

Rob Cook

November 30, 2016 – In July, Rob Cook was named the Executive Director of Ontario Racing. TROT Magazine sat down with Cook for a one-on-one interview, to learn about his background, the role of Ontario Racing, and his view of the future of the sport in Ontario. By Darryl Kaplan

TROT: Can you tell us a little about your experience and your new role in the horse racing industry?

Rob Cook: Clearly my background is not in horse racing. I don’t profess to be an expert in horse racing. What I do have is considerable experience and knowledge in not-for-profit associations, government advocacy, marketing – the kinds of skills and experience you need to run a strong industry association. I’ve worked in two major industry associations. I’ve had the senior staff position in both those organizations – CEO and President – so that’s my background. There are lots of people that have huge experiences in this industry. I need to rely on those people as I build my knowledge of horse racing.

TROT: What are the key things you’ve learned in the past few months?

Cook: What intrigued me about this industry are the complex policy issues. Not that they’re that much more complex than other industries, but these issues are unique in the horse racing space. Clearly the first observation I made is that there is scar tissue and a focus on what has happened (in the past). It’s a huge shift. What has happened is a challenge, in changing the focus to look forwards instead of backwards. I run into that every day for sure.

TROT: What should the industry know about Ontario Racing?

Cook: Ontario Racing was formed on the notion that the industry needs a strong industry association to speak to government. Government has supported that. OR has been in operation for the past eight months. We’ve recently been using the OHRIA (Ontario Horse Racing Industry Association) Board in an advisory capacity and the decision was made for them, on an interim basis, to officially be the Ontario Racing Board. We recognize that’s an interim step. OHRIA isn’t necessarily 100% representative of the industry today, so we also have a governance group that has been charged with developing a new governance structure for the Board and ensuring that there is complete representation of the industry. The expectation is that there will be a new structure by the end of 2016/beginning of 2017 – at the latest.

TROT: How do you address a general feeling from some groups who may feel that this group doesn’t represent them. How do you bring them in?

Cook: If that was easy, there are many other things I could or would do. That’s not an easy challenge. There’s lots of organization in this space and there are many individual interests. We have challenges related to horsemen’s representation on the standardbred side. All we can do is make sure that OR has a structure that provides a conduit for everyone in the industry and hopefully OR will represent the views of everyone. But it’s always going to be hard – we’ll have to operate based on consensus.

TROT: What about some more divisive issues like what tracks will race. Will OR make recommendations on those issues?

Cook: The structure that is envisioned is for post 2021, and possibly earlier if it’s the wish of the industry – the concept when it’s in place would be to have one racing alliance that includes all tracks. The government will funnel its funding support through one transfer payment to that alliance. That alliance will make decisions. There will be linkages between public money and what the return is – employment return, wagering return and more sustainability. That puts decisions in the hands of the industry and it starts to put a more sustainable business case to how you make investment.

The alliance would develop a program on what racing would look like, where it happens, purse levels and dates. That would be approved by the Board of Directors of the alliance. There are tough decisions to make there. That report goes to the Ontario Racing Board of Directors to provide an approval process. So the presumption is if OR is concerned with how money is allocated, there would be some mechanism for dealing with that. If OR believes that proposal is in the best interests of the industry, it would approve it and it would go on to OLG, which would have an approval process, and ultimately to AGCO which has the regulatory oversight. There’s lot of stop points to have checks and balances.

TROT: There was a recent announcement of a new horsemen’s alliance group. Are you concerned at all that there will be other groups that will go directly to government and give them different messages than the one being given by OR?

Cook: That’s the prerogative of other groups to do that. If they feel they can’t get their message through OR. It will be up to government to whether they listen to other groups or not. Am I concerned about it? If there’s not a consistent message from the industry, that’s bad for the industry.

Where there are other groups and other interests, we want to align together as best we can to present a common message. OR is not on an empire building exercise to try to consolidate the industry under our wing. We need to make sure we’re working on a common message because that’s the only way we give the industry the strength it needs to push back on government.

TROT: How about concerns that OR may be too close to government? If issues come up where the industry feels they really need to take a stand with government, is OR independent enough to do that?

Cook: I can understand where people may have that view looking outside-in because we have spent a lot of time working with government to try to get a long term funding arrangement, so we can consult with the industry. So in some ways to our detriment, we’ve spent a lot of time looking at government and not at the industry but I expect that page to turn once we’ve started moving forward, looking at what we really need to do. Clearly, OR’s vision is that we’re the representative of the industry [in Ontario] and if that means taking hard positions with government in the interests of the industry, that will happen. That needs to be tempered that we take responsible, realistic approaches. We’ve already talked to the opposition. People may see government as too close, but I don’t think that’s the case.

TROT: When it comes to the plan being proposed to the industry, is the plan set, and the consultation is about tweaking the plan, or is the slate open for something different if you heard opposition?

Cook: We want to hear from the industry – every point of view. If people don’t think this is the right plan, we want to hear that. If this is not the plan, we want to hear other options. It’s not a done deal. It needs to be negotiated. There are lots of question marks and even in the early part of consultation there are areas that are already on the table.

TROT: What is Woodbine Entertainment Group’s role in this proposal, and what should it be going forward?

Cook: I know there are lots of opinions about WEG but I think when you look at the industry it’s pretty hard to imagine the industry operating without the facilities that WEG operates. WEG has provided a key management role in the Standardbred Alliance. They are the big player in the game and that sometimes makes people uncomfortable. What we’ve tried to do is develop something where we can leverage the expertise, knowledge and resources of WEG for the betterment of everybody and have the checks and balances to make sure that’s always done for the best interests of everyone. WEG does not have the majority of directors so there are other people that will have decision making in the alliance. There are counterbalances and checks in place.


Rob Cook with Standardbred Canada President & CEO Dan Gall

TROT: What’s your feeling about government and how they see horse racing in Ontario, from the very top down?

Cook: People in government recognize the horse racing file as a very difficult file. That’s probably based on the history of it, the Slots at Racetracks program, and the fallout from it. What we have seen is a genuine interest and commitment at the political level of the government to be helpful. People can blame the government for being where we are today but I think there is a legitimate political commitment to support the industry. It also exists on the opposition side – probably both parties.

TROT: The plan that the industry is currently being consulted on details a government funding extension in Ontario for 17 years beyond 2021, but the structure is divided into separate parts?

Cook: It’s really structured as seven years guaranteed and the option for two, five-year renewable terms, and the five-year terms are based on performance indicators. Has the money that’s been invested for seven years got us further ahead for a sustainable industry? Seven years is committed and they would look at measures and indicators and see if there is growth, is wagering coming up, is the industry doing better, and if so, they would renew for another five. It’s metric performance-based thinking.

TROT: Where does OMAFRA (Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs) fit in?

Cook: They have an interest in horse racing. The Minister is interested. As a Ministry, they do provide funding for the enhanced Horse Improvement Program (HIP). It wasn’t until fairly recently that the transfer payment agreements with OMAFRA, to support the enhanced HIP program, were extended from 2019 to 2021. We are trying to get confirmation of enhanced HIP from 2021 forward. People will clearly recognize that the amount of money is $93.4 million. What is absent from that is the current seven odd million for enhanced HIP. With the enhanced HIP it’s $100 million, not 93. We don’t know where the ministry is on enhanced HIP. Our hope is that we will be able to receive some kind of commitment through negotiation that OMAFRA is still engaged in supplying those dollars through a different pool of money, to support those activities. They have an interest in the rural and economic development impact of the industry.

To be honest the very first discussion we had around the long term funding arrangement, it was the first question, what about enhanced HIP – 2021 and beyond, because it’s critical to breeders. We didn’t have an answer. We still don’t have an answer. Everybody including government is crystal clear that breeding and investment cycles are four to five years and people need to make decisions based on that.

TROT: What’s been your impression of the everyday horseperson?

Cook: It’s easy to say – It’s an industry full of hardworking people and people that have a genuine interest in success of their own business and of the industry. I have been in the backstretch, in paddocks, at as many racetracks as possible, I’ve visited breeders. I’ve tried to reach out. I’ve said at the start that I don’t know a lot about horse racing but that’s not the long term objective. I need to know as much as I can as quick as I can. It’s a good industry full of good people. Lots of people have opinions and some of them aren’t always positive, but that’s ok. You need to hear those just as much as you need to hear others.

TROT: What should OLG integration mean to the industry? Are new gaming products a part of it?

Cook: Our view is that at some point, whether it be betting at corner stores, historical horse racing, or other products – which are things being talked about right now again – those are extra revenue sources that need to come to bear for horse racing to be successful in the long run. There is dialogue within OR on what types of products are needed, and discussion with OLG about how we can move toward some of these products.

A key point is that this funding agreement, and the money we’re talking about, is not enough to keep the industry sustained. We are going to focus back on things like product development with OLG. Clearly we have to find other ways to grow wagering and other products that can bring sustainability to the industry. The industry needs to be more self sustaining.

TROT: Is there any other message that you want the industry to know about OR?

Cook: My goal is that the industry sees Ontario Racing as their champion. That doesn’t mean everybody is always going to be in the same place and on the same wavelength, but generally the success of representing the industry means that OR has to have that role, and people have to see that role. If we don’t do it, that’s a problem, but if people don’t see OR as valuable, that’s a problem as well. There’s work to do there. I know that, as do my staff and the Board at OR. Hopefully at the end of these consultations we can move from a point of frustration to a sense of what they like and what they don’t like. Clearly Ontario Racing has said to government that we need the consultation results. This next step is negotiating an agreement.

First Consultation Round Concludes

November 22, 2016 – The seventh and final consultation session regarding the proposed long-term funding framework for Ontario’s horse racing industry took place on Tuesday (Nov. 22) in Milton, Ont.

A gathering of 100-plus people attended the session orchestrated by Ontario Racing at the Country Heritage Park’s Gambrel Barn. OR’s executive director Rob Cook discussed the framework while Woodbine Entertainment Group’s executive vice-president of racing, Jamie Martin spoke about the current Standardbred Alliance.

The status of the enhanced HIP program was an issue raised by both thoroughbred and standardbred participants, with each considering that program crucial going forward. According to Cook, the current $93.4-million amount does not include the approximate $7 million provided by OMAFRA for the HIP program and he’s received no confirmation yet from that arm of government if that will continue. The suggestion was made to reinforce the necessity for such incentives through the feedback channels.

Purse levels were also discussed in a variety of formats. From other sessions, the notion that the $93.4 million being considered is a number that hasn’t been indexed to inflation. Cook noted that OR is aware of this. Others wondered how racing can increase that number, with Cook noting that racing must look to grow purses through increasing handle and also with new future product offerings in concert with an integrated OLG.

That comment spurred a question regarding marketing and promoting racing, and whose court this ball falls into.

“It’s a great question; right now there are lots of people trying to do that,” said Cook, mentioning efforts from OLG, racetracks, OR and other groups all doing something. “Clearly that needs to be better organized, co-ordinated…funds need to be directed to where we can get the most outcome….that’s work that needs to be done. Whether it’s part of this Alliance or whether it’s the industry as a whole coming together and figuring out how to make that happen.

“The interesting thing in all the consultations we’ve had with lots of people, the word ‘customer’ gets mentioned about twice. Clearly we need to focus back on customers and bettors and the growth of wagering.”

Audience members from the session gave their own feedback on making that happen. One industry participant stressed the need for OLG to take a strong role in making horse racing one of its most prized products. Another came forward with a multi-track handicapping contest idea designed to get fans out and active at the smaller, regional tracks.

OLG’s Cal Bricker spoke to the two products that were offered within the last year: the Triple Crown scratch game and the Fire Horse online game, which he categorized as ‘awareness products’ and recognized that there wasn’t any significant revenue generated from those offerings. Bricker also explained that other issues prevented more substantial integrated products being released.

“One of the issues we were facing was we had this modernization agenda going on at OLG and putting products out to the marketplace, we were really in a tough position in terms of what spaces we could actually operate in. We weren’t able to be in a position to tie a service provider’s hands in terms of the kinds of things we’d like to be able to do in the future. So that really limited us.”

Bricker noted that in the last few weeks OLG has received more clarity on the lottery side of things and so OLG is now looking for opportunities in that space right now with products that will not just create awareness but enhance the money available to the horse racing industry. He was hopeful that something would be offered within the 2017 calendar year.

Cook mentioned during his framework overview that the horse racing industry could possibly see this framework implemented earlier than 2021 if that was the will and consensus of the industry — possibly as early as 2019. While some within the session would appreciate the certainty provided by the framework, some wondered why there was such a rush to have this framework put into place.

Dr. Paul Branton spoke on behalf of the Horse People’s Alliance of Ontario, and questioned why there was this pressure to approve a funding model that wouldn’t kick in for essentially another four-plus years when the industry could possibly make better decisions if they had access to different and more constructive information.

Branton also mentioned the issue of transparency, as this information referenced and requested isn’t currently available.

“We need to know how big the pot is that we’re working with, so we can grow on that.”

Cook agreed that all organizations want to see more transparency going forward. He noted that OR will post as much of that information on its website as possible. He also noted that the timeline is a government timeline and not something constructed by OR. He also reiterated that the OR board does not control this process and that the framework being discussed will essentially lead to an agreement between OR and government, but it will ultimately need to be signed off at the government level.

“There’s no board being created at OR that’s going to run this process in a short number of weeks.”

Cook did say that OR governance is a discussion that’s currently taking place internally, and that industry reach-out would take place through the constituent groups of OR.

“The goal isn’t that we want to be secretive or that we want to reach an outcome that the industry wouldn’t be supportive of,” noted Cook. “I’ll take that comment back…that’s not part of the funding [discussion] but I’ll take that back to OR.”

How would a change in government impact OR? “Good question,” said Cook. “Who knows? What does a change in government mean for the $93.4 million? Is it going to be there still or is it going to be gone, we don’t know.”

Cook continued that OR’s intent is to go forward “irrespective of who is in government, and try to represent the industry.”

One of the final comments of the day spoke to industry representation, with one standardbred horseman stating that the rural and outlying segments of the industry aren’t properly represented by the former OHRIA/current OR board. Cook noted that the constituent level of the OR board is based currently on organizations but it might not stay this way.

“This is a problem area we have,” said Cook speaking to the multitude of standardbred horseperson’s groups in the province, “we understand that. I don’t know how we’re going to deal with it but we’re interested in people coming forward saying they have a group that would like to be involved. As we work governance through we’re going to have to somehow figure a way to accommodate them. The intention is not to leave major pieces of the industry out.”

Representatives from OR told Trot Insider that they expect the initial report of feedback to be released in early December.


This framework, subject to government approval, will be presented to the industry for feedback. If approved, this framework will provide the industry as a whole – from owners, trainers and breeders to racetrack operators – with the certainty they need to make investments in their businesses.

OR’s primary objective, to this point, has been to engage directly with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. and the government to provide input to the development of a road map to sustainable funding for the industry. Now, OR’s focus will shift towards engagement with the industry as a whole to garner feedback on this proposed framework.

This proposed framework is based on key principles including:

  • A new racetrack alliance: all Ontario racetracks that conduct live racing will be invited to create a new alliance. It is proposed that Woodbine Entertainment Group (WEG) will serve as the administrator of this new alliance.
  • Longer-term, predictable funding: Ontario’s horse racing industry can invest in their businesses beyond 2021.
  • Ongoing accountability and transparency: decision-making based on evidence and agreed upon success indicators.
  • Industry leadership: racetrack business plans, race dates, purse levels will be aligned across racetracks for a coordinated approach. Ontario Racing will play a key industry leadership role in the future.

Widespread ‘in person’ conversations with the industry about these principles will continue across Ontario. Sessions will take place in every region of the province that has horse racing. The following consultation schedule has been updated. (dates subject to change)

  • Saturday, November 19 – 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Port Perry (Golfer’s Dream Golf Club, Scugog)
  • Tuesday, November 22 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Milton (Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park)

Ontario Racing encourages all interested parties to submit their feedback about the future of the industry by accessing its online consultation portal here. The portal includes a series of questions and the option to attach a word document, for those who would like to share additional thoughts. The proposed long-term funding framework was outlined in a webinar, hosted on October 19, and can be viewed here.

Ontario Racing will collate feedback from the industry, and this perspective will inform recommendations to government.

(With files from Ontario Racing)

Consultations Continue Tuesday

November 21, 2016 – Ontario Racing (OR) will conclude the first round of scheduled in-person consultations on Tuesday, Nov. 22 regarding a proposed long-term funding framework for horse racing in the province.

The six previous sessions transpired in Toronto, Dundas, Sarnia, London, Ottawa and Port Perry. Tuesday’s session takes place from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. at Milton Heritage Park’s Gambrel Barn, just outside Milton, Ont.

This framework, subject to government approval, will be presented to the industry for feedback. If approved, this framework will provide the industry as a whole – from owners, trainers and breeders to racetrack operators – with the certainty they need to make investments in their businesses.

OR’s primary objective, to this point, has been to engage directly with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. and the government to provide input to the development of a road map to sustainable funding for the industry. Now, OR’s focus will shift towards engagement with the industry as a whole to garner feedback on this proposed framework.

This proposed framework is based on key principles including:

  • A new racetrack alliance: all Ontario racetracks that conduct live racing will be invited to create a new alliance. It is proposed that Woodbine Entertainment Group (WEG) will serve as the administrator of this new alliance.
  • Longer-term, predictable funding: Ontario’s horseracing industry can invest in their businesses beyond 2021.
  • Ongoing accountability and transparency: decision-making based on evidence and agreed upon success indicators.
  • Industry leadership: racetrack business plans, race dates, purse levels will be aligned across racetracks for a coordinated approach. Ontario Racing will play a key industry leadership role in the future.

OR will be releasing a preliminary consultation report shortly after the last in person consultation event on Tuesday. This preliminary report will be available for additional industry review and comment, before it is submitted to the OR Board of Directors, OLG and government, to inform the next steps in funding negotiations.

Phase two of this consultation will begin when the preliminary consultation report has been composed; this will be shared through the organization’s mailing list, posted online, and discussed directly with all industry association groups. A further 30 days will be allowed for feedback on the preliminary report, as part of OR’s commitment to ensure that industry views and perspectives on next steps towards a sustainable racing future are well represented.

Ontario Racing encourages all interested parties to submit their feedback about the future of the industry by accessing its online consultation portal here. The portal includes a series of questions and the option to attach a word document, for those who would like to share additional thoughts. The proposed long-term funding framework was outlined in a webinar, hosted on October 19, and can be viewed here.

Ontario Racing will collate feedback from the industry, and this perspective will inform recommendations to government.

(With files from Ontario Racing)

(SC)

Strong Turnout For Sixth Consultation

November 19, 2016 – Approximately 150 people attended Saturday’s public consultation session in Port Perry, Ontario, hosted by Ontario Racing (OR).

The session, the sixth meeting focusing on the long-term funding framework for horse racing in the province, was the highest attended meeting to date.

Ontario Racing Executive Director Rob Cook hosted the consultation, which included passionate horsepeople from all three racing breeds.

Dr. Ted Clarke, General Manager of Grand River Raceway, talked to the audience about the current Standardbred Racetrack Alliance and spoke about some of the successes to date.

“The goal was to increase wagering and we’ve done that,” said Clarke. “One of the significant things about the wagering that comes in through the Alliance is that all of the revenues go directly to purses.”

Questions raised, during the 2-1/2 hour meeting at Golfer’s Dream Golf Club, Scugog in Port Perry, Ont., focused on some key themes.

There were a number of questions about tracks operating if they have no on-site casino gaming. Kawartha Downs was raised as a track that could become “extinct” without gaming.

“That might be a possibility,” said Cook in response. “There’s a limited amount of money. There’s a risk that there’s going to be casualties along the way.”

In response, the crowd applauded the idea that Kawartha Downs be guaranteed racing dates throughout the year.

Justin Picov, representing Ajax Downs, asked, “In the event that (we lose slots), is there a plan from OLG to preserve quarter horse racing?”

“I can’t answer that question,” said Cook. However, Cook did mention that OR represents the interests of all three breeds.

Suggestions were made to pass a law that a percentage of wagering and slots go directly towards racing. The idea of inflation was also raised as a concern, as $93.4 million in 2038 (at the end of the term) is much lower than it is in 2016.

Cook said that inflation is an issue they will look at.

“The government is saying right now that $93.4 million is on the table,” said Cook. “Do you want it or not? We’ll take back any answer you give us but we have to be prepared with an alternative. Right now we have an opportunity to get a government commitment but we don’t know that commitment will be there months from now.

“We have to know if you like the amount of money being proposed or if you need OR going to government asking for more,” he said.

Bob Broadstock of the Quarter Horse Owners Association expressed his concern that quarter horse racing will end in 2019 unless there’s a new agreement for the breed, and also concerns for each breed and its smaller tracks.

“The intent is that the horseperson’s groups are at the table to ensure that the plan works for all breeds,” said Cook. “We’re working on governance to ensure checks and balances and make sure we represent everyone.”

The attendees raised the issue of whether or not there is enough money in the plan, and whether B track horsemen can survive.

“Everybody knows there’s problems with purses and people are struggling to survive, we know that,” said Cook. “If there’s ways to improve this, if you say that public consultation is needed going forward, we’re open to that.”

The question of Woodbine Entertainment Group’s role in the program was also raised.

“The new Alliance is designed so that Woodbine doesn’t control it,” said Cook. “This model is designed to prevent some of these concerns. Can I guarantee you that this is going to be smooth, probably not, but we have the balances and counterbalances in place.”

Cook also addressed the question on whether OLG will help with new gaming products to support horse racing.

“Developing new revenue streams is very important,” said Cook. “Right now the OLG is not privatizing lotteries which opens up a new opportunity to look at products in that space. I think there’s a new interest from OLG in talking to us.”

Cook said it was anticipated that the agreement would be done, or in final draft form, by the end of March.

As for whether the current proposal is the only option, Cook said, “The game of all of this is not to create a system. It’s about getting to an outcome, and we need to look at all options to get there.”

The next in-person consultation session will held on Tuesday, November 22 from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. in Milton (Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park).


This framework, subject to government approval, will be presented to the industry for feedback. If approved, this framework will provide the industry as a whole – from owners, trainers and breeders to racetrack operators – with the certainty they need to make investments in their businesses.

OR’s primary objective, to this point, has been to engage directly with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. and the government to provide input to the development of a road map to sustainable funding for the industry. Now, OR’s focus will shift towards engagement with the industry as a whole to garner feedback on this proposed framework.

This proposed framework is based on key principles including:

  • A new racetrack alliance: all Ontario racetracks that conduct live racing will be invited to create a new alliance. It is proposed that Woodbine Entertainment Group (WEG) will serve as the administrator of this new alliance.
  • Longer-term, predictable funding: Ontario’s horse racing industry can invest in their businesses beyond 2021.
  • Ongoing accountability and transparency: decision-making based on evidence and agreed upon success indicators.
  • Industry leadership: racetrack business plans, race dates, purse levels will be aligned across racetracks for a coordinated approach. Ontario Racing will play a key industry leadership role in the future.

Widespread ‘in person’ conversations with the industry about these principles will continue across Ontario. Sessions will take place in every region of the province that has horse racing. The following consultation schedule has been updated. (dates subject to change)

  • Saturday, November 19 – 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Port Perry (Golfer’s Dream Golf Club, Scugog)
  • Tuesday, November 22 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Milton (Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park)

Ontario Racing encourages all interested parties to submit their feedback about the future of the industry by accessing its online consultation portal here. The portal includes a series of questions and the option to attach a word document, for those who would like to share additional thoughts. The proposed long-term funding framework was outlined in a webinar, hosted on October 19, and can be viewed here.

Ontario Racing will collate feedback from the industry, and this perspective will inform recommendations to government.

(With files from Ontario Racing)

(SC)

Consultations Continue Saturday

November 18, 2016 – Ontario Racing (OR) will host its sixth scheduled in-person consultation on Saturday, Nov. 19 regarding a proposed long-term funding framework for horse racing in the province.

This framework, subject to government approval, will be presented to the industry for feedback. If approved, this framework will provide the industry as a whole – from owners, trainers and breeders to racetrack operators – with the certainty they need to make investments in their businesses.

OR’s primary objective, to this point, has been to engage directly with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. and the government to provide input to the development of a road map to sustainable funding for the industry. Now, OR’s focus will shift towards engagement with the industry as a whole to garner feedback on this proposed framework.

This proposed framework is based on key principles including:

A new racetrack alliance: all Ontario racetracks that conduct live racing will be invited to create a new alliance. It is proposed that Woodbine Entertainment Group (WEG) will serve as the administrator of this new alliance.

Longer-term, predictable funding: Ontario’s horseracing industry can invest in their businesses beyond 2021.

Ongoing accountability and transparency: decision-making based on evidence and agreed upon success indicators.

Industry leadership: racetrack business plans, race dates, purse levels will be aligned across racetracks for a coordinated approach. Ontario Racing will play a key industry leadership role in the future.

Next steps include widespread ‘in person’ conversations with the industry about these principles, across Ontario. Sessions will take place in every region of the province that has horse racing. The following consultation schedule has been updated. (dates subject to change)

Saturday, November 19 – 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Port Perry (Golfer’s Dream Golf Club, Scugog)

Tuesday, November 22 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Milton (Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park)

The five previous sessions transpired in Toronto, Dundas, Sarnia, London and Ottawa.

Ontario Racing encourages all interested parties to submit their feedback about the future of the industry by accessing its online consultation portal here. The portal includes a series of questions and the option to attach a word document, for those who would like to share additional thoughts. The proposed long-term funding framework was outlined in a webinar, hosted on October 19, and can be viewed here.
Ontario Racing will collate feedback from the industry, and this perspective will inform recommendations to government.

(With files from Ontario Racing)
(SC)

Online Consultation Portal Launched

November 1, 2016 – Industry consultations regarding a proposed long-term funding framework for horse racing have begun, with Ontario Racing making stops in Toronto and at Flamboro Downs this week.

You can view a full list of upcoming consultations here, with the next opportunity for in-person engagement taking place in Sarnia at Hiawatha Horse Park on November 9.

  • Wednesday, November 9 – 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. – Sarnia (Hiawatha Horse Park)
  • Sunday, November 13 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – London (Western Fair Raceway)
  • Wednesday, November 16 – 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. – Ottawa (Rideau Carleton Raceway)
  • Saturday, November 19 – 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Port Perry (Golfer’s Dream Golf Club, Scugog)
  • Tuesday, November 22 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Milton (Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park)

Ontario Racing encourages all interested parties to submit their feedback about the future of our industry by accessing our online consultation portal here. The portal includes a series of questions and the option to attach a word document, for those who would like to share additional thoughts. The proposed long-term funding framework was outlined in a webinar, hosted on October 19, and can be viewed here.

Ontario Racing will collate industry feedback, and that perspective will inform next steps in negotiations with government on a path forward for a sustainable horse racing industry in Ontario.

(with files from OR)

(Standardbred Canada)

2017 Ont. Race Date Applications

October 21, 2016 – As part of Ontario Racing’s commitment to transparency and industry self-determination, the 2017 Racetrack Race Date applications are available on the OR website.

The feedback on the respective applications will be collated from October 20 to November 6 and will support the Ontario Racing Interim Board of Directors’ position as it relates to the final recommendations for approvals.

Ontario Racing will provide the recommendation to the OLG, who is responsible for reviewing application as it relates to funding.

Upon completion of review, OLG will relay its recommendations to AGCO. The AGCO, in its capacity as industry regulator, will provide a final approval.

Please provide your feedback and recommendations to feedback@ontarioracing.com

Long Term Funding Consultations Begin

Consultations have begun regarding a proposed longer-term funding framework and agreement for the horse racing industry beyond 2021. This framework, subject to government approval, will be presented to the industry for feedback – beginning with a webinar that took place on October 19th. A recording of that webinar can be found here. Ontario Racing is committed to responding to every query that we receive regarding the proposed funding plan.

The information presented to the racing industry during this session was intended to form a knowledge basis regarding the proposed funding framework, in advance of opportunities for in-person consultations and written feedback.

We encourage industry participants to join us at sessions which will take place in every region of the province that has horseracing, throughout the month of November. Thoseconsultation dates can be found here. There will also be an opportunity to provide written feedback, through a portal on our website.

As the industry association for horse racing in Ontario, Ontario Racing will collate feedback from all industry participants that wish to offer it. That feedback will be compiled into a report, which will be made public, and which will inform recommendations to government regarding next steps.

(Ontario Racing)

(Standardbred Canada)

Ontario Racing Webinar Info Posted

October 19, 2016 – The information presented by Ontario Racing in its webinar regarding the proposed long-term funding framework for horse racing in the province is now available.

The slides from the webinar are presented below, or available here.

This framework, subject to government approval, will be presented to the industry for feedback. If approved, this framework will provide the industry as a whole – from owners, trainers and breeders to racetrack operators – with the certainty they need to make investments in their businesses.

OR’s primary objective, to this point, has been to engage directly with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation and the government to provide input to the development of a roadmap to sustainable funding for the industry. Now, OR’s focus will shift towards engagement with the industry as a whole to garner feedback on this proposed framework.

This proposed framework is based on key principles including:

  • A new racetrack alliance: all Ontario racetracks that conduct live racing will be invited to create a new alliance. It is proposed that Woodbine Entertainment Group (WEG) will serve as the administrator of this new alliance.
  • Longer-term, predictable funding: Ontario’s horseracing industry can invest in their businesses beyond 2021.
  • Ongoing accountability and transparency: decision-making based on evidence and agreed upon success indicators.
  • Industry leadership: racetrack business plans, race dates, purse levels will be aligned across racetracks for a coordinated approach. Ontario Racing will play a key industry leadership role in the future.

Next steps include widespread ‘in person’ conversations with the industry about these principles, across Ontario. Sessions will take place in every region of the province that has horse racing, starting next week and taking place throughout the month of November. (dates subject to change)

  • Monday, October 31 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Toronto (Holiday Inn – Toronto International Airport)
  • Tuesday, November 1 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Hamilton (Flamboro Downs)
  • Wednesday, November 9 – 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. – (Hiawatha Horse Park)
  • Sunday, November 13 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – London (Western Fair Raceway)
  • Wednesday, November 16 – 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. – Ottawa (Rideau Carleton Raceway)
  • Saturday, November 19 – 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Port Perry (Location TBD)
  • Tuesday, November 22 – 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Milton (Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park)

Industry participants can also provide feedback by answering consultation questions online on the Ontario Racing website.

Ontario Racing will collate feedback from the industry, and this perspective will inform recommendations to government.

(with files from Ontario Racing)

(Standardbred Canada)