February 7, 2016

Reminder: CPMA Guideline Change

January 4, 2015 – On Monday, October 19, officials with the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency issued a memo to all Canadian racing bodies announcing that the elimination guidelines for Methylprednisolone will change effective January 1, 2016.

In its release, the CPMA stated that the elimination of Methylprednisolone from a horse can take an extended period of time and that owners and trainers should govern themselves accordingly.

Additionally, the CPMA states that owners and trainers should always consult their own veterinarian for advice and guidelines.

A copy of the memo – which appears in both English and French – can be accessed by clicking here.

(Standardbred Canada)

CPMA Guideline Change for Methylprednisolone

Jan. 1, 2016 – On Monday, October 19, officials with the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency issued a memo to all Canadian racing bodies announcing that the elimination guidelines for Methylprednisolone will change effective January 1, 2016.

In its release, the CPMA stated that the elimination of Methylprednisolone from a horse can take an extended period of time and that owners and trainers should govern themselves accordingly.

Additionally, the CPMA states that owners and trainers should always consult their own veterinarian for advice and guidelines.

A copy of the memo – which appears in both English and French – can be accessed byclicking here.

Methylprednisolone Guideline Change

October 21, 2015 – On Monday, October 19, officials with the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency issued a memo to all Canadian racing bodies announcing that the elimination guidelines for Methylprednisolone will change effective January 1, 2016.

In its release, the CPMA stated that the elimination of Methylprednisolone from a horse can take an extended period of time and that owners and trainers should govern themselves accordingly.

Additionally, the CPMA states that owners and trainers should always consult their own veterinarian for advice and guidelines.

A copy of the memo – which appears in both English and French – can be accessed byclicking here.

CPMA Ractopamine Clarification

September 1, 2015 - On Tuesday, September 1, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) issued a further notice to the Canadian horse racing industry in regard to ractopamine.

The notice states that the CFIA’s ‘Type A’ commercial feed facility designation is limited to the drug ractopamine and means that the feed facility does not have ractopamine on its premises. However, it is important to note that this designation does not prevent such a facility from having other drugs on its premises that may be prohibited under the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervisions Regulations.

The release also states that Type A commercial feed facilities are not the only feed facilities that do not use ractopamine. There are other feed mills that do not have this designation that may be drug free and therefore would not have ractopamine on their premises.

The release concludes by stating that it remains the responsibility of owners and trainers to ensure that the horse feed and supplements they use are free from substances that may result in a positive test under the Regulations.

The contents of the release appear below.


Ractopamine in Feedstuffs – Clarification

This is further to the notices to industry issued by the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) regarding the use of ractopamine in feedstuffs and, more specifically, theAugust 21, 2015 update respecting the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Canadian Ractopamine Free Certification Program and the identification of Type A commercial feed facilities.

The CPMA wishes to clarify that the CFIA’s Type A commercial feed facility designation is limited to the drug ractopamine and means that the feed facility does not have ractopamine on its premises. However, it is important to note that this designation does not prevent such a facility from having other drugs on its premises that may be prohibited under the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervisions Regulations (the Regulations).

In addition, Type A commercial feed facilities are not the only feed facilities that do not use ractopamine. There are other feed mills that do not have this designation that may be drug free and therefore would not have ractopamine on their premises.

The CPMA does not endorse any particular type of facility and does not provide any type of guarantee with respect to any feed supplier, its products or its facilities. It remains the responsibility of owners and trainers to ensure that the horse feed and supplements they use are free from substances that may result in a positive test under the Regulations.


Related Stories

• August 27: Purina’s Comments On The CPMA Ractopamine Update
• Sharpe: Letter Regarding Ractopamine
• CPMA Update On Ractopamine

New Clenbuterol Rules Now In Effect

September 1, 2015 - The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency has issued an important reminder to the Canadian horse racing industry that a significant change to the elimination guideline for Clenbuterol will come into effect September 1. The change states that the current elimination guideline for Clenbuterol will be increased from 72 hours to 168 hours (seven days).

The main points from the CPMA’s changes to the elimination guidelines are as follows:

  1. The current elimination guideline for the 0.40 mg oral dose given twice daily for 5 days of clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) contained in the 2011 edition of the Schedule of Drugs booklet will be increased from 72 hours to 168 hours (7 days).
  2. CPMA is temporarily removing the elimination guideline for the 0.30 mg intravenous single administration until further studies are completed.
  3. The 0.32 mg oral single administration will no longer have an elimination guideline.

To view a copy of the CPMA’s memorandum, click here.

The CPMA has announced that the changes will come into effect on September 1, 2015.

The contents of the memorandum appear below.


This memo is to inform the horse racing industry of upcoming changes to the elimination guidelines for CLENBUTEROL.

Specifically:

  1. The current elimination guideline for the 0.40 mg oral dose given twice daily for 5 days of clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) contained in the 2011 edition of the Schedule of Drugs booklet will be increased from 72 hours to 168 hours (7 days).
  2. CPMA is temporarily removing the elimination guideline for the 0.30 mg intravenous single administration until further studies are completed.
  3. The 0.32 mg oral single administration will no longer have an elimination guideline.

There are several medications that may be used as alternatives for clenbuterol. The CPMA provides elimination guideline for some of these substances in the 2011 Schedule of Drugs.

To allow ample time for the industry to adjust to the new elimination guidelines, these changes will come into effect on September 1, 2015 and will be reflected in the next version of the Schedule of Drugs booklet expected to be released later this year.

As always, the CPMA recommends that owners and trainers consult their own veterinarian for advice and guidance in the use of all drugs.


La présente vise à informer l’industrie des courses de chevaux de la modification des lignes directrices d’élimination du CLENBUTEROL.

Plus précisément :

  1. La ligne directrice d’élimination actuelle pour la dose orale de 0,40 mg de clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) donnée deux fois par jour pendant cinq jours indiqué dans l’Annexe des drogues 2011 (brochure) passera de 72 heures à 168 heures (sept jours).
  2. L’ACPM supprime temporairement la ligne directrice d’élimination pour la dose unique de 0,30 mg par intraveineuse jusqu’à ce que plus d’études soient complétées.
  3. La dose orale unique de 0,32 mg ne sera plus assortie d’une ligne directrice d’élimination.

Plusieurs médicaments peuvent être utilisés à la place du clenbuterol. L’ACPM fournit des lignes directrices d’élimination pour certaines de ces substances dans l’Annexe des drogues de 2011.

Afin que l’industrie ait le temps de s’adapter aux nouvelles directives d’élimination, les modifications susmentionnées prendront effet le 1er septembre 2015 et seront incluses dans la prochaine version de l’Annexe des drogues, qui devrait être publiée plus tard cette année.

Comme toujours, l’ACPM recommande que les propriétaires et les entraîneurs consultent leur vétérinaire pour se faire conseiller sur l’utilisation de toutes les drogues.

(CPMA)
(Standardbred Canada)

 

Statement On Ractopamine In Feedstuffs

August 25, 2015 - This memo is to comment on the CPMA press release issued on Friday, August 21st, regarding “Ractopamine In Feedstuffs Update”.

In the press release, the CPMA “reminds race horse owners and trainers that it remains their responsibility to obtain horse feed and supplements that are free from substances that may trigger a positive test such as ractopamine.” It goes on to suggest that “Race horse trainers and owners may wish to obtain their feed from facilities that have been designated as Type A which are those commercial facilities that manufacture, handle and/or distribute only feeds that do not contain ractopamine.” The press release then gives a CFIA link to view the status of mills involved in the Canadian Ractopamine-Free Pork Certification program.

While we commend the efforts of CPMA to bring awareness to the issue of safe manufacturing of feed by avoiding purchasing feed supplied by mills that include Ractopamine in their production, the list provided by CFIA is far from being inclusive in safe options available to Ontario’s horsemen. The list does not include any of the drug-free equine production facilities in Ontario, such as Agribrands Purina in Strathroy, Brooks Feeds in Port Perry, and Sharpe Farm Supplies in Moffat. None of these plants are listed on the CFIA website as they do not manufacture pig feed, hence are not part of the CFIA Canadian Ractopamine-Free Pork Program. These plants are completely drug-free, not just Ractopamine free, offering zero chance of feed contamination from medications, which puts them in a classification far above any type A or B designation when it comes to feed safety! To be a Type A plant, the feed mill cannot use Ractopamine in their manufacturing, but can use a number of other medications in the feed mill such as Rumensin, which is deadly to horses. For complete feed safety, horsemen should be asking for more than just a Type A designation of their feed supplier.

Paul Sharpe
Sharpe Farm Supplies

(Standardbred Canada)

CPMA Update On Ractopamine

Friday, August 21, 2015 - On Friday, August 21, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency issued a memo to the Canadian horse racing industry which contained an update regarding Ractopamine in ‘feedstuffs.’

An official copy of the memo can be accessed by clicking here.

The contents to the memo appear below in both English and French.


Ractopamine In Feedstuffs Update

This memo is further to our notices to industry on February 14 and November 3, 2014, on the subject of ractopamine in feedstuffs wherein we reminded race horse owners and trainers that it remains their responsibility to obtain horse feed and supplements that are free from substances that may trigger a positive test such as ractopamine.

Please be advised that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has published a list of commercial feed facilities enrolled in the Canadian Ractopamine-Free Pork Certification Program. Race horse trainers and owners may wish to obtain their feed from facilities that have been designated as Type A which are those commercial facilities (feed mills and feed retail outlets) that manufacture, handle and/or distribute only feeds that do not contain ractopamine. They have never manufactured and/or distributed mixed feeds containing ractopamine (including trucking) or have followed the protocols established by CFIA to clean-up their facility.

The list, along with information regarding the Canadian Ractopamine-Free Pork Certification Program can be viewed here. Please note that this list is being updated as new facilities enroll.

Should you have any questions, please contact the CPMA at 1-800-268-8835, or by email at cpmawebacpm@agr.gc.ca.

Reminder: Ont. Cobalt Testing In Aug.

July 24, 2015 - The Ontario Racing Commission (ORC) issued a Notice to the Industry on June 3, 2015 advising that Ontario will begin testing for cobalt with a threshold of 50ng/ml in blood, as of August 1, 2015.

Racing participants are reminded that all horses that have been selected to provide an Official Sample (blood), as defined by the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA), will also be tested for cobalt. Once the CPMA has completed the official testing, the ORC will subject the sample to enhanced testing for the presence of cobalt.

On July 17, 2015, Steve Suttie, Executive Director of the CPMA, wrote to ORC CEO and Executive Director Jean Major. The letter summarized the CPMA’s continuing research on cobalt and provides additional information to help racing participants make informed decisions on the use of cobalt in race horses. A copy of the letter is attached to this Notice.

The ORC will also be implementing a policy which allows for trainers and owners to have a claimed horse post-race tested for cobalt at their own expense. If you wish to have a horse tested that you have claimed, please note that on the Official Claim Form

Please note that if a claimed horse is found to have unacceptable levels of cobalt during an approved post-race test, the Judges/Stewards have the authority, at the option of the claimant, to rule a claim invalid.

The ORC believes that cobalt testing is not only a matter related to the integrity of horse racing but more importantly an animal welfare issue. When administered in appropriate quantities, there is likely very little performance benefit to cobalt. And when used in excess, this element can be toxic to horses.

(ORC)
(Standardbred Canada)

CPMA Statement On Positive Tests

July 8, 2015- On Wednesday, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) issued a statement regarding recent positive tests for Oxilofrine.

On June 24, Trot Insider posted a letter from two veterinarians regarding tests for oxilofrine coming, in their opinion, from the administration of ephedrine in antihistamine products.

The statement from the CPMA is available in English and French.


SUBJECT: Certificates of Positive Analysis for Oxilofrine

Oxilofrine is an amphetamine type stimulant. Its use has been reported in human and equine athletes. The Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) categorizes it as a Class 2, Penalty A substance. The Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations do not permit the use of oxilofrine.

Recently conducted target testing for the drug oxilofrine resulted in four certificates of positive analysis being issued in the province of Ontario. Consequently, the CPMA carried out an investigation. A preliminary explanation for these positives may be the result of horsemen using products containing ephedrine.

CPMA is conducting further research on oxilofrine and ephedrine, and will advise the industry of its findings upon completion of these studies.

In the meantime, measures have been instituted to ensure that a positive test will not result when products containing ephedrine are used in a manner consistent with the elimination guidelines provided in the CPMA’s 2011 Schedule of Drugs booklet.


OBJET : Certificats d’analyse positive pour l’oxilofrine

L’oxilofrine est un stimulant de type amphétamine. Son usage a été rapporté chez des athlètes humains et équins. L’Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) la catégorise comme substance de classe 2 et pénalité A. Le Règlement sur la surveillance du pari mutuel n’autorise pas l’utilisation de l’oxilofrine.

De récents tests ciblés de dépistage de la drogue oxilofrine se sont soldés par la délivrance de quatre certificats d’analyse positive pour la province de l’Ontario. Par conséquent, l’ACPM a mené une enquête. Une explication préliminaire de ces cas pourrait être l’utilisation, par les professionnels du cheval, de produits contenant de l’éphédrine.

L’ACPM effectue présentement de plus amples recherches sur l’oxilofrine et l’éphédrine et avisera l’industrie des résultats à la fin de l’étude.

Des mesures ont été mises en place pour s’assurer qu’un résultat d’analyse positive ne sera pas obtenu lorsque des produits contenant de l’éphédrine sont utilisés conformément aux lignes directrices sur l’élimination énoncées dans la brochure « Annexe des drogues 2011 » de l’ACPM.


(CPMA)

Clenbuterol Elimination Guideline Change

June 18, 2015 - On Thursday, June 18, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency issued a memorandum to provincial regulatory bodies, Canadian horse racing associations and horsepeople’s groups in regard to changes to the elimination guideline for Clenbuterol.

The contents of the memo appear below.

An official copy of the memo can be accessed by clicking here.


SUBJECT: Changes to the elimination guideline for CLENBUTEROL

This memo is to inform the horse racing industry of upcoming changes to the elimination guideline for CLENBUTEROL.

Specifically:
1. The current elimination guideline for the 0.40 mg oral dose given twice daily for 5 days of clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) contained in the 2011 edition of the Schedule of Drugs booklet will be increased from 72 hours to 168 hours (7 days).

2. CPMA is temporarily removing the elimination guideline for the 0.30 mg intravenous single administration until further studies are completed.

3. The 0.32 mg oral single administration will no longer have an elimination guideline.

There are several medications that may be used as alternatives for clenbuterol. The CPMA provides elimination guideline for some of these substances in the 2011 Schedule of Drugs.

To allow ample time for the industry to adjust to the new elimination guidelines, these changes will come into effect on September 1, 2015 and will be reflected in the next version of the Schedule of Drugs booklet expected to be released later this year.

As always, the CPMA recommends that owners and trainers consult their own veterinarian for advice and guidance in the use of all drugs.

(CPMA/Standardbred Canada)